Choosing a Forex Broker

Before trading Forex you need to set up an account with a Forex broker. So what exactly is a broker? In simplest terms, a broker is an individual or a company that buys and sells orders according to the trader’s decisions. Brokers earn money by charging a commission/spread or a fee for their services.

 

You may feel overwhelmed by the number of brokers who offer their services online. Deciding on a broker requires a little bit of research on your part, but the time spent will give your insight into the services that are available and commission/spread or fee charged by various brokers.

 

Is the Forex broker regulated?

 

When selecting a prospective Forex broker, find out with which regulatory agencies it is registered with. In the United States a broker should be registered as a Futures Commission Merchant (FCM) with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and a NFA member. The CFTC and NFA were made to protect the public against fraud, manipulation, and abusive trade practices.

Among the registered firms, look for those with clean regulatory records and solid financials. Stay away from non‐regulated firms.

 

Customer Service

 

Forex is a 24‐hour market, so 24‐hour customer support is a must! Can you contact the firm by phone, email, chat, etc.? Do the reps seem knowledgeable? The quality of support can vary drastically from broker to broker, so be sure to check them out before opening an account.

 

Here’s a good tip: choose several online brokers and contact their help desks. Seeing how quickly they respond to your questions can be good in gauging how they will respond to your needs. If you don’t get a speedy reply and a satisfactory answer to your question, you certainly wouldn’t want to trust them with your business.

 

 

Broker Policies

 

Before selecting an online Forex broker, you should closely examine their features and policies. These include:

 

  • Available Currency Pairs

 

You should confirm that the prospective broker offers, at minimum, the seven major currencies (AUD, CAD, CHF, EUR, GBP, JPY, and USD).

 

  • Transaction Costs

 

Transaction costs are calculated in pips. The lower the number of pips required per trade by the broker, the greater the profit that the trader makes. Comparing pip spreads of half dozen brokers will reveal different transaction costs. For example, the bid/ask spread for EUR/USD is usually 1 pips, but if you can find 0.5 pips, that’s even better.

 

  • Margin Requirement

 

The lower the margin requirement (meaning the higher the leverage), the greater the potential for higher profits and losses. Margin percentages. Low margin requirements are great when your trades are good, but not so great when you are wrong. Be realistic about margins and remember that they swing both ways.

 

  • Minimum Trading Size Requirement

 

The size of one lot may differ from broker to broker, spanning 1,000, 10,000, and 100,000 units. A lot consisting of 100,000 units is called a “standard” lot or 1 lot. Consisting of 10,000 units is called a “mini” lot. A lot consisting of 1,000 units is called a “micro” lot. Some brokers even offer fractional unit sizes.

 

  • Rollover Charges

 

Rollover charges are determined by the difference between the interest rate of the country of the base currency and the interest rates of the other country. The greater the interest rate differential between the two currencies in the currency pair, the greater the rollover charge will be. For example, when trading GBP/USD, if the British pound has the greater interest differential with the U.S. dollar, then the rollover charge for holding British pound positions would be the most expensive. On the other hand, if the Swiss Franc were to have the smallest interest differential to the U.S. dollar, then overnight charges for USD/CHF would be the least expensive of the currency pairs.

 

 

  • Trading Hours

 

Nearly all brokers align their hours of operation to coincide with the hours of operation of the global Forex market: 5:00 pm EST Sunday through 4:00 pm EST Friday.

 

Other Policies

 

Be sure to scrutinize a prospective broker’s “fine print” section to be fully aware of all the nuances that a specific broker may impose on a new trader.

 

Finding the right broker is a critical part of the process. It’s not easy and requires some real work on your part. Don’t pick the first one that looks good to you. Keep looking and trying different demo accounts.

 

What to look for in an online Forex broker/dealer:

 

  • Low Spreads.

 

  • Low minimum account openings.
  • Instant automatic execution of your orders.
  • Leverage